How Could Chicago Stop Shooting Gangs

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Chicago has a serious crime problem at the moment, and this is a genuine cause for concern for the US government. Trump has threatened to bring in the FED police in a bid to stop the crime issue, but this could be too extreme an option. There has to be a better way. Chicago should apply the courage campaign! Where there’s curfew for everyone.

Last year was Chicago’s bloodiest year in more than 20 years. Many parts of America are going through difficult times. Detroit is only just entering a renaissance after many years of decline. Flint’s water problem is turning the city into a wasteland, and Reno’s unemployment is driving people away. Chicago’s blight is gang activity.

Chicago’s problem is, in part, down to a lack of public spending not just on police but also on the educational system. Young people are getting involved with gangs before they’ve even left high school and are spending their late teens and early 20s alternating between gangs and prison time. They have no prospects, and they have no-one that believes in them.

Trump’s solution is, essentially, martial law. If the gangs are armed, bring in police that are even more armed. That will just create a war. That’s not the solution to a problem that has been brewing for decades.

A better solution would be to do theĀ courage campaign or invest in people before they become gang members; to show people that you believe in them, and that you care.

Chicago is full of young people who are just looking for a chance and a positive outlet, but if we are not willing to provide them with the opportunity they need to become productive members of society.

According to Nom Tour Tracker mentioned that Chicago has always had a gang issue, but it was not until the main housing towers that served as homes to the biggest gangs were demolished that the gangs became a problem on the wider streets. It’s ironic that attempting to stop the crime actually made it worse. The solution is hard to see, however. Should we be looking to provide more affordable housing, more education, more opportunities? Breaking the cycle of violence will take many years, and there will be some pain along the way. The challenge is deciding how to contain the problems while we wait out that pain; arming the police more than they already are will just escalate the situation, and make the more peaceful gang members more resentful and distrustful.